JUNE 2008

Standards for hazardous waste combustion revised

The United States Environmental Protection Agency issued the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for new and existing hazardous waste combustors on October 12, 2005. The April 8, 2008 amendments to this rule revise or clarify several compliance and monitoring provisions in the October 12, 2005 rule. In addition, these amendments correct several omissions and typographical errors. These changes are as follows:

  • Finalizes a sunset provision for the interim standards for incinerators, cement kilns, and lightweight aggregate kilns;
  • Clarifies the applicability of the particulate matter detection system requirements for sources equipped with fabric filters;
  • Clarifies that periodic confirmatory performance testing for dioxin/furans is not required for sources that are not subject to a numerical dioxin/furan emission standard;
  • Clarifies the periodic performance testing requirements for sources operating under the interim standards;
  • Finalizes a performance test waiver provision for sources subject to hazardous waste thermal concentration limits if the source feeds low levels of metals or chlorine in the hazardous waste;
  • Clarifies the procedures to calculate rolling averages for the metals and chlorine standards;
  • Revises when a source must submit subsequent periodic reviews of its eligibility for the health-based compliance alternative for total chlorine;
  • Clarifies the mercury standard for new and existing cement kilns;
  • Clarifies whether interim status sources need to obtain approval before proceeding with facility modifications required to meet the MACT emission standards;
  • Clarifies the applicability of Title V permit requirements for area sources for boilers and HCl production furnaces;
  • Revises the startup, shutdown, and malfunction plan provision.

The revised provisions are effective immediately and the final rule doesn’t change the October 14, 2008 compliance date set by the October 2005 final rule.

The EPA believes that these amendments will reduce compliance uncertainties and improve understanding of the final rule requirements.