JUNE 2010
                                        

Boston becomes first to approve Ford Transit Connect taxi

Saying the 2011 Ford Transit Connect Taxi “fits the bill,” the city of Boston became the first municipality in America to approve the versatile cab for taxi use, paving the way for taxi owners to purchase the new vehicle for their fleets.

Boston, the 10th largest metropolitan area in the United States, regulates which types of vehicles can be used as taxicabs in its city streets. To be approved for taxi use, a vehicle must meet basic size requirements for headroom, legroom and cargo space.

The roomy, flexible interior of the Transit Connect – 2010 North American Truck of the Year – is perfectly suited for taxi service. Its open architecture provides excellent interior headroom and passenger visibility and, with 6.5 inches of ground clearance, passengers step easily through the sliding doors.

With its standard 2.0-liter four-cylinder gas engine and automatic transmission, the conventionally powered Transit Connect is expected to deliver an estimated 30 percent improvement in fuel economy versus many of today’s traditional taxis.

Because taxi operators also asked for a version that runs on alternative fuels, Ford is offering new engine prep packages that allow conversions to both compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied propane gas (LPG).

Both CNG and LPG lower taxi fleets’ operating costs and are better for the environment. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, CNG is less expensive and burns cleaner than gasoline, resulting in 30 to 40 percent less greenhouse gas emissions. Propane also burns cleaner than gasoline.

Built on a dedicated commercial vehicle platform tested to meet Ford’s light commercial vehicle durability standards, Ford’s new Transit Connect Taxi also features a wiring upfit package, vinyl flooring and standard third-row windows – all of which are factory-installed.