SEPTEMBER 2010
                                        

J. Solotken Scrap relocates metal recycling facility

J. Solotken Scrap, an Indianapolis scrap metal dealer, recently held a grand opening celebration for friends, family and business associates.

After nearly 75 years in the same downtown location, J. Solotken Scrap celebrated its move to their new Indianapolis headquarters in the city’s East side by hosting a reception for some 150 guests.

The new facility, in which J. Solotken began operation March 1, had been left empty in May, 2008, following the closure of another local business. J. Solotken and Co. purchased the building in December, 2008 and over the past 15 months has invested approximately $4.5 million to turn a once-vacant building into an efficient scrap metal recycling facility.

“To have the opportunity to feature our operation to our clients in a way that is different from how you would normally see it is unique…yet it’s important for what it says about our business and what we’ve continued to try to do for more than 90 years,” said Brian Nachlis, vice president at J. Solotken.

He continued, “we’ve changed the entire structure of how we recycle the metal that comes to us,” said Nachlis. “From the docks on which materials are received…to the processes we use to move it through the facility, everything has changed. Now, our production capacity has increased dramatically; we’ve gone from packaging scrap 500 pounds at a time and hand tying it together to 2,000 pounds and tying it automatically.

“As a result, we’re able to process larger truckloads and a mix of different types of scrap,” added Nachlis.

Originally founded in 1914, the company has installed state-of-the-art equipment, such as a high-tech baling system, to quickly process the nonferrous metals that are recycled each day. In addition, the building is now equipped with energy-efficient lighting, new fire suppression and security systems, as well as a more advanced HVAC set-up.

The entire shape of the company has changed, too, as the old facility consisted of a maze of work areas spread out over three floors. Moving to the new facility made it possible to put the entire operation under one roof, with a 40 foot high ceiling. Materials are received on three receiving docks including a bulk storage area that includes drive-through access for easier loading/unloading. Inside, the facility features two scales for weighing loads and a third scale outside.

Locally, the company employs 35 people, but it was recently ranked as one of the oldest and largest family-owned businesses in Indianapolis.